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Would You Call This A Bad Beat?

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Would You Call This A Bad Beat? - Tue Apr 08, 2014, 07:41 AM
(#1)
JesusFan_123's Avatar
Since: Jun 2010
Posts: 16
This is a Play Money Sit&Go. I put the money in with KK against KQ. The villain won with a flush.

 
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Tue Apr 08, 2014, 07:54 AM
(#2)
bhoylegend's Avatar
Since: Jun 2012
Posts: 2,261
Yes, that's a bad beat.
 
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Tue Apr 08, 2014, 08:02 AM
(#3)
donkkilla76's Avatar
Since: Mar 2014
Posts: 107
wow that sucks problem is you get a lot of people who are either just bad players or just dont take it very seriously, to me why play if your not going to play properly, but i suppose if everybody played well it would make for a very boring game
 
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Tue Apr 08, 2014, 12:10 PM
(#4)
cleobuddy's Avatar
Since: Jan 2014
Posts: 67
What makes that a bad beat served by a bad player? Odds of a pocket pair are 16:1 for one opponent, 3x that for three). Someone went all-in with KQ in late position and was called by KK. KK was put into as decision here regarding a good chunk of their stack. That's perfectly fine. KK called knowing a single Ace could have beaten it + a series of other less obvious hands- a known risk taken by the holder of KK. KK equity against a pretty tight range is about 75%, which is great, but a 25% shot at loosing is not a bad beat in my book. Everything that happens after this (the subsequent knowledge of the hero's holding) is irrelevant because both are already all-in based in those considerations. The hand played out and KK lost because it had a chance to lose. It's as simple as that. KK did not deserve to win here because it went all-in. It could have gone all-in against AA just as easily. Would the loss sting less if it had been an villain Ax holding?

A bad beat can vary is definition, but when you are beat by a bet made in a situation where there is a known equity of less than 4-5%, that' s a hard pill to swallow. This wasn't the case here. KQ had 44% equity against three random starting hands + good fold equity. He was shooting from a favorable equity position if you want to look at it that way. Why he would open all-in in questionable, but it certainly helps the fold equity for presenting strength. I'm not surprised to see this in a play money game where people are learning to win and people are learning how they can lose.
 
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Tue Apr 08, 2014, 12:42 PM
(#5)
donkkilla76's Avatar
Since: Mar 2014
Posts: 107
Quote:
Originally Posted by cleobuddy View Post
What makes that a bad beat served by a bad player? Odds of a pocket pair are 16:1 for one opponent, 3x that for three). Someone went all-in with KQ in late position and was called by KK. KK was put into as decision here regarding a good chunk of their stack. That's perfectly fine. KK called knowing a single Ace could have beaten it + a series of other less obvious hands- a known risk taken by the holder of KK. KK equity against a pretty tight range is about 75%, which is great, but a 25% shot at loosing is not a bad beat in my book. Everything that happens after this (the subsequent knowledge of the hero's holding) is irrelevant because both are already all-in based in those considerations. The hand played out and KK lost because it had a chance to lose. It's as simple as that. KK did not deserve to win here because it went all-in. It could have gone all-in against AA just as easily. Would the loss sting less if it had been an villain Ax holding?

A bad beat can vary is definition, but when you are beat by a bet made in a situation where there is a known equity of less than 4-5%, that' s a hard pill to swallow. This wasn't the case here. KQ had 44% equity against three random starting hands + good fold equity. He was shooting from a favorable equity position if you want to look at it that way. Why he would open all-in in questionable, but it certainly helps the fold equity for presenting strength. I'm not surprised to see this in a play money game where people are learning to win and people are learning how they can lose.
im sorry but i cant see how you can find any logic in that play the blinds low and he pushed for all his stack with most of the table not even acted, every hand has a chance to lose ,it doesnt make it the right play to push allin with any hand. It may not be the worst beat in history but its still bad just the same.
 
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Tue Apr 08, 2014, 03:02 PM
(#6)
ArtySmokesPS's Avatar
Since: Oct 2011
Posts: 7,359
When all the money went in, you were a prohibitive favourite, with almost 91% equity. You can't really ask for better than that (except for when villain has K2o), so it's a bad beat. Villain will win about one time in eleven, so you just have to suck it up and keep getting your money in as a favourite.


Bracelet Winner
 
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Tue Apr 08, 2014, 04:44 PM
(#7)
666bonez187's Avatar
Since: Oct 2012
Posts: 745
this would be the equivalent of flipping a coin..... but the coin has a head on each side... and u bet someone that it will land on heads and they say no it wont and take your bet.... and u sit there dumb founded when the coin lands and balances on its edge, standing vertically upright... to prove everything can be beat... even if it requires a miracle
 

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