Home / Community / Forum / Poker Education / Texas Hold'Em Cash Games /

2nl Cash FR, KK play review

Old
Lightbulb
2nl Cash FR, KK play review - Tue Aug 19, 2014, 10:59 AM
(#1)
AJ_Orion's Avatar
Since: Jul 2014
Posts: 31
I just got done with this hand. I was unsure about it so thought I would post it up. Do you think it was the right call? Would anyone recommend playing differently after the flop?

Villain stats after approximately 30 hands:
vpip: 33
pfr: 25
agf: 1.25





AJ_Orion

Last edited by AJ_Orion; Tue Aug 19, 2014 at 12:10 PM..
 
Old
Default
Tue Aug 19, 2014, 12:25 PM
(#2)
JWK24's Avatar
Since: Jun 2010
Posts: 24,812
(Super-Moderator)
BronzeStar
As loose and aggressive as this opp is, I'd think they would normally raise AhX preflop, so while they could have a flush, I wouldn't expect it to be the nut flush. Due to this, I have 10 outs to a full house or better and another 7 outs to a flush (if they have it). If they don't have the flush, I'm ahead... I'm calling.

John (JWK24)


Super-Moderator



6 Time Bracelet Winner


 
Old
Default
Tue Aug 19, 2014, 01:49 PM
(#3)
Tyirl's Avatar
Since: Dec 2012
Posts: 389
Well, maybe I'm doing this wrong, but I think that even if the villain has a flush that isn't the nut flush then you have the correct odds to call with the amount of outs you would have.

You have to call $1.60 into $2.55, so if I'm doing this correctly then you would need to have better than about 37% equity to call and your actual equity vs a hand like QJ of hearts would be about 38%.

Please, one of you guys that's good at math let me know if this is correct. I'm bad at math, but I do see the need for it in poker so I would like to know if I'm doing it right, lol.

Thanks!


T
 
Old
Default
Tue Aug 19, 2014, 04:35 PM
(#4)
ponymeup's Avatar
Since: Aug 2014
Posts: 1
overbets are rarely the nuts. therefore, your opponent either the bare ace of hearts or even possibly AA with the Ah. Either way you are either way ahead or priced in given your hand as he may even have a non nut flush made there making your heart draw live also. Your main problem is you are playing .01/.02 so you can never really know what kind of player or hand you are against here. I am never folding here though, ever, even at .01/.02.
 
Old
Default
Wed Aug 20, 2014, 08:57 PM
(#5)
TheLangolier's Avatar
Since: Jun 2010
Posts: 13,501
(Head Trainer)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tyirl View Post
Well, maybe I'm doing this wrong, but I think that even if the villain has a flush that isn't the nut flush then you have the correct odds to call with the amount of outs you would have.

You have to call $1.60 into $2.55, so if I'm doing this correctly then you would need to have better than about 37% equity to call and your actual equity vs a hand like QJ of hearts would be about 38%.

Please, one of you guys that's good at math let me know if this is correct. I'm bad at math, but I do see the need for it in poker so I would like to know if I'm doing it right, lol.

Thanks!


T
Hi Ty,

The math you did is right. Keep in mind our equity vs the made flush is very different if he had QhJh as opposed to the AhJh, since our Kh gives us a bigger flush draw in addition to the board pairing outs. Likewise if we didn't hold the Kh, our equity would be less.

The hand is still a call imo, since in addition to all that, we can't rule out the villain doing this with the naked Ah or a smaller set sometimes as well, which we destroy equity wise and gives us the # we need to call off here.


Head Live Trainer
Check out my Videos

4 Time Bracelet Winner



 
Old
Default
Wed Aug 20, 2014, 09:27 PM
(#6)
Tyirl's Avatar
Since: Dec 2012
Posts: 389
Cool, thanks Dave!

Yeah, I agree, I wouldn't be folding in that spot, but I was thinking that the math makes it ok to call even if he was somehow able to show us that he actually had a flush that was smaller than the nut flush. I wasn't sure I was doing it right, though, lol.

I can do some math, like I know that 2+2=5, but when it's more complex than that I have a hard time.


T
 

Getting PokerStars is easy: download and install the PokerStars game software, create your free player account, and validate your email address. Clicking on the download poker button will lead to the installation of compatible poker software on your PC of 51.7 MB, which will enable you to register and play poker on the PokerStars platform. To uninstall PokerStars use the Windows uninstaller: click Start > Control Panel and then select Add or Remove programs > Select PokerStars and click Uninstall or Remove.

Copyright (c) PokerSchoolOnline.com. All rights reserved, Rational Group, Douglas Bay Complex, King Edward Road, Onchan, Isle of Man, IM3 1DZ. You can email us on support@pokerschoolonline.com