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5NL AQo

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5NL AQo - Sat Aug 12, 2017, 05:30 PM
(#1)
sjb958's Avatar
Since: Dec 2012
Posts: 1,537


How are we meant to play these types of hands on these types of boards?

I get confused. If we bet and get raised then we usually have to fold. So is check calling all streets better? If the spade hits then what? Aren't we just letting our opponent hit his spade for free when we check to him?

I think I need an explanation on check-calling. When should we do it. Why are we doing it? And I always see check calling as 'letting my opponent get there for free' which is maybe not the case? It's a big area of my game that I struggle with, because usually when I check call, my opponent ends up hitting his hand and I lose. Which sucks. And puts me off check-calling.

Last edited by sjb958; Sat Aug 12, 2017 at 05:40 PM..
 
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Sat Aug 12, 2017, 09:30 PM
(#2)
TheLangolier's Avatar
Since: Jun 2010
Posts: 13,512
(Head Trainer)
So, I'm generally going to start with a c-bet. Our hand is strong enough to bet for value as we will be called by many worse aces and singleton spades. Since you started by checking the flop definitely we are going to call his bet. Turn I would proceed the same way. And as the river essentially bricks off check/calling there is fine. You can also make a case for betting the river... weaker aces may be inclined to check and show down, as will the nut flush draw (which missed but paired the K), and all those hands will call a bet.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sjb958 View Post
I think I need an explanation on check-calling. When should we do it. Why are we doing it? And I always see check calling as 'letting my opponent get there for free' which is maybe not the case? It's a big area of my game that I struggle with, because usually when I check call, my opponent ends up hitting his hand and I lose. Which sucks. And puts me off check-calling.
So there are 2 situations that are primed for check-calling. 1 being slow playing a monster, like TT on TT4 or KK on K33, I think those are obvious (our hand isn't vulnerable and our opponents likely don't have much to give action with so we give them chances to bluff and/or catch up a bit).

The other is the one you're really asking about, medium strength hands. When we are betting for value, those bets only gain value if they get called by enough worse hands. So when you have some sort of made hand you are always trying to evaluate what worse hands in villains range will call if you bet. Good candidate hands for a check call are those that are too strong to want to fold, but not strong enough to bet for value because if we do bet, when we get called we won't fair too well vs their range. On your hand above a weak suited ace or KK would be good examples of this which is why they make pretty clear checks (and calls) on the flop. Also important to note with hand strengths of this ilk we are not ahead as much, villain has more hands in their range ahead of us. Sometimes with medium strength hands we are not giving a free card, we are taking one. Or inducing some bluffs which medium strength hands are perfect to pick off. I would say try to digest that for starters, does that make sense?


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Sat Aug 12, 2017, 09:45 PM
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RichyRob's Avatar
Since: Mar 2015
Posts: 342
I prefer to bet, bet, check-call these but that could be wrong.

I find the problem with bet flop, check-call turn is that most aggressive players will bet the turn on this board when you check to them. By betting the turn and then getting raised, I can happily fold knowing I'm most probably behind. By checking I also give them the opportunity to check behind and draw out on me.
 
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Sun Aug 13, 2017, 05:04 AM
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ADWish's Avatar
Since: Feb 2014
Posts: 463
Well played IMO. Villain's river bet is sickening but we've got to call that off.

Betting the flop and check-calling the turn and river would be viable too. I always start with checking top pair OOP though. I'd only bet this flop with flushes and sets.
 
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Sun Aug 13, 2017, 03:56 PM
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ArtySmokesPS's Avatar
Since: Oct 2011
Posts: 7,359
In heads up pots OOP, the main reason to check-call is to induce villain to bluff with hands that would fold if you bet.

e.g. If you c-bet this flop, villain snap-folds JThh or two red sevens, but he might take a stab if you check. Sometimes, checking is literally the only way to get villain to put money in the pot with a worse hand.

I would actually check-call the flop on this board, as I've got so few value-combos (flushes and 2prs) when the ace is on the board, but c-betting small should be OK.

I agree with ADW that villain's river bet is sickening. He's definitely polarized when he bombs it. He either has the flush or a busted draw (sets should check back somewhere along the line). Since you beat all the bluffs, you're in sigh-mode, but a call will be close to breakeven if villain is vaguely balanced. If he's a value-heavy nit, you should fold.

Apart from his pre-flop call, villain's line is pretty standard. He has no showdown value and a decent blocker, and if he does this with a couple of other bluffs (KQ with a spade, 99 with a spade), your AQo should become precisely breakeven (KK and A7s are clearer calls). (JT often makes for an ideal triple barrel bluff when it doesn't improve, because it flops/turns so many draws, but also has blockers to calling hands.) I think I'd be happier about calling if I had the Qs in my hand. With this combo, I think I'd actually fold. You can get an awesome feeling when you call down vs a triple barrel bluff and are right though. Nice hand!


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